Stacks, ‘Pacs’, and User Hacks: A Handheld History of Personal Computing

General discussion about calculators, Swiss Micros or otherwise
Post Reply
jonmoore
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2020 2:18 pm

Stacks, ‘Pacs’, and User Hacks: A Handheld History of Personal Computing

Post by jonmoore » Tue May 05, 2020 5:05 pm

This makes for a good read, what with the 41x and 43s/c on the horizon.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/wh ... ore-reader

The Whipple Museum of the History of Science at Cambridge University here in the UK has a permanent collection of personal calculators which was kindly donated by Francis Hookham (who sadly died in March this year). The bulk of the collection is HP and the museum published a book last year detailing the whole of their collection (great read throughout) but it also includes a sizeable chapter on Hookam's HP calculator collection and the cultural changes that came about during those nascent days of personal computing when HP engineers were most definitely the thought leaders.

I know the story has been told a thousand times over in multiple internet hangouts but I think the history is particularly well researched and written (as you'd expect from an academic writer).

Apologies if you've seen it before (I did check to see if it was mentioned on the Museum forum, but couldn't find anything).

Here's the Museum blurb specific that adds extra detail and context.

jonmoore
Posts: 106
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2020 2:18 pm

Re: Stacks, ‘Pacs’, and User Hacks: A Handheld History of Personal Computing

Post by jonmoore » Tue May 05, 2020 8:16 pm

Forgot to add. The part I enjoyed most was the copious number of footnotes, perfect for a bookworm like me. And considering it's a Cambridge University Press book, the writing has plenty of personality (most definitely a rarity when it comes to typical academic writing!).

User avatar
H2X
Posts: 593
Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2017 6:00 am
Location: Norway

Re: Stacks, ‘Pacs’, and User Hacks: A Handheld History of Personal Computing

Post by H2X » Tue May 05, 2020 9:01 pm

Amusing, thanks for sharing! :-)
DM42 #40 running WP43C | DM41X #50
The earth is flat. It just appears round because it is massive and curves spacetime.

Post Reply