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Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:36 pm
by michaelzinn
Hi.

Can I keep the calculators next to regular magnets (e.g. refrigerator magnets)? I understand that a hard drive or floppy disk would be problematic because they store data magnetically, but do the SwissMicros replicas contain anything that could be affected?

Thanks!

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:56 pm
by Walter
I'd dare to state that they are magnet-proof.

Reasoning: Data are no more stored in magnetic cores. Nor is any magnetic disk or the like implemented in this calculator. There are neither Hall sensors nor Reed relais built in. And there aren't any electron tubes like in your great-grandparents' radios or your grandparents' or parents' TV sets. Instead, all good'ol silicon electronics. No chance for static magnetism to influence anything.

So don't worry, be happy! Enjoy!

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:37 am
by WigglePig
I have now tested my DM15 in some serious magnetic fields and I can confirm that:
a) the DM15 is not adversely affected by static magnetic fields of around 1T
b) the DM15 is caused to give sporadic garbled output with alternating fields (50 Hz and 400 Hz) of over 0.8 T
c) the casing screws seem to be very interesting in a static field of 8T
d) my DM15 is still working perfectly after being abused in this way.

Regards

Jason :D

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:33 pm
by Walter
WigglePig wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:37 am
I have now tested my DM15 in some serious magnetic fields and I can confirm that:
a) the DM15 is not adversely affected by static magnetic fields of around 1T
b) the DM15 is caused to give sporadic garbled output with alternating fields (50 Hz and 400 Hz) of over 0.8 T
c) the casing screws seem to be very interesting in a static field of 8T
d) my DM15 is still working perfectly after being abused in this way.
Which is the lab you work in?

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Wed May 13, 2020 2:56 pm
by WigglePig
Ahh, well that would be telling!

Suffice to say that high-power radio transmitter equipment can generated really quite large magnetic fields, usually around the power supply systems for the power amplifier final stages.

Regards
Piggly

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Wed May 13, 2020 6:31 pm
by RAPo
well you need 16 T in order to levitate a frog (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg ... irrelevant).

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Wed May 13, 2020 7:51 pm
by Walter
RAPo wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 6:31 pm
well you need 16 T in order to levitate a frog (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg ... irrelevant).
Thanks for sharing. 16 T is huge! 8-)

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Thu May 14, 2020 3:16 am
by toml_12953
RAPo wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 6:31 pm
well you need 16 T in order to levitate a frog (https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg ... irrelevant).
Flying cars* anyone?

* All the rage in views of the future from the 1930s to the '50s

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Thu May 14, 2020 7:28 am
by Olivier de Nantes
I may give you some more informations.

I worked for some years in a smelter in France (Pechiney plant). This plant was (and still is) producing primary aluminium. In order to do so, they actually use 380 000 Amps under 1024 Volts, in 254 tanks with a electrical connexion in serial configuration ; when I was working there, it was only 280 000 Amps.
That produce very strong magnetic fields which is dangerous for people using a pacemaker of less big problem, with mechanical swatches.

They were no problem with the calculator I sometime use in the workshop (it was a HP 42s : I'm not sure that this company and model are really known in this forum :) ).

The 42s is still working without any trouble.

However, I did not try a SwissMicros calculator !

But if it can help

Olivier

Re: Are the calculators magnet-proof?

Posted: Thu May 14, 2020 9:51 am
by Walter
There shouldn't be any problem with any modern pocket calculator as long as we talk about static magnetic fields and the calculator isn't moving fast. :mrgreen: Reasons are given in post #2. :geek: And since the calculator back is made of stainless (austhenitic) steel, it won't even start moving fast on its own. :shock: So don't worry, be happy. 8-)